Gondwana Link

Gondwana Link Blog

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Feral Cat workshop
Last Friday's Feral Cat workshop, organised by Oyster Harbour Catchment Group, was a great success. The day consisted of a series of self-managed, open discussions on topics put forward by the participants! The flavour of the topics varied from ‘Is it worth undertaking a feral cat control if it is not part of an integrated feral control program?’ and ‘How can we collaborate more effectively?’ to ‘How do we win the hearts and minds of people to better manage cats?’?
05/03/2019
Posted by: Amanda Keesing
Predator Free 2050, NZ
Sharing experiences across the Tasman (and boasting a bit). Last week we had a very enjoyable and informative visit from Ed Chignell, CEO of the ambitious Predator Free 2050, a program working to transform wildlife across New Zealand by getting rid of feral predators. It was wonderful to talk with someone so visionary, to hear of other transformative NZ efforts such as their Billion Tree program, and to swap notes on how to provide effective support across numerous groups and individuals.
15/02/2019
Posted by: Keith Bradby
Filming to make short documentaries
Yes we are out there gathering some of many stories about the wonderful people, groups and places we work with. Gondwana Link now has an ongoing program of short documentaries, and maybe a a long one or two, with 'Sound in the Ground' the first to be filmed. Its incredibly exciting what local groups like Friends of the Porongurups have achieved, and its time to share that excitement with a much wider audience.
12/11/2018
Posted by: Keith Bradby
Introducing Associate Professor Eugene Eades
Ladies and gentlemen. We'd like to introduce Associate Professor Eugene Eades from Curtin University, pictured here with his colleague Professor Jill Downie, also from Curtin. Eugene's appointment as Adjunct Associate Professor was announced today, at Nowanup, by Professor Deborah Terry, Vice-Chancellor of Curtin, in a delightful ceremony which included the signing of a Statement of Intent between Curtin and Gondwana Link to establish the Nowanup Learning Centre (aka the Bush University).
27/09/2018
Posted by: Keith Bradby
Nowanup Rangers blitz on Victorian Tea Tree
Wonderful to see the first people of the country out managing the country. Well done Nowanup Rangers, Fitzgerald Biosphere Group and all involved.
05/09/2018
Posted by: Keith Bradby
New bushland looking great
They are proud of their new bushland out in Ranges Link - and so they should be. Looking great! Woogenellup local species mix direct seeded, matched to soil type.
13/08/2018
Posted by: Keith Bradby
Rain triggers tree planting
Enough rain to start getting those seedlings into the ground, and hopefully more rain coming this week to water them in. Today Errol Eades and Jason Bolton are working north of Cranbrook on the first planting in Greening Australia's current 1000 ha program across Gondwana Link (funded through the Australian Government's 20 Million Trees program).
26/06/2018
Posted by: Keith Bradby
Porongurup 'Art in the Park'
We have to share these great pics by Frank Rijavec and Barbara Madden of the recent ‘Art in the Park’ exhibition hosted by the Friends of the Porongurup Range. Frank’s pictures show ‘Steel Feather’ by Kevin Draper; ‘Pelican Pete’ by Brad Lucas; ‘Re-pressed’ by Paul Elliot; ‘Mountain Mural’ by South Stirling Primary School. Barb’s photos show her cyclist friends enjoying ‘Peddling Back in Time’ by Luke Barker, and ‘280’ parrots by Dave Taylor. Enjoy!
02/05/2018
Posted by: Keith Bradby
Ngadju Jungkajunkga Day
It's on again! The Ngadju Conservation Aboriginal Corporation presents a fun filled cultural day in Norseman on 21 April 2018.
08/04/2018
Posted by: Keith Bradby
Fences and connectivity
A global collective of renowned scientists has produced a good, if slightly gruesome in its photos, article about the damage big fences do to connectivity across the world.
03/04/2018
Posted by: Keith Bradby
Birds of a feather?
Kevin Draper’s stunning ‘Steel Feather’ (for scale, find my hat) is one of my favourites in the current Porongurup Range ‘Art in the Park’ event. The scale of the feather seems to fit the grandeur of the birds – the Forest Red-tailed Cockatoo – especially in that magnificent setting.
02/04/2018
Posted by: Keith Bradby
A must see!
Blessed with another large Noongar painting in the Gondwana Link office foyer. Basil Schur (Green Skills) commissioned this canvas by Errol Eades and his partner Audrey Bolton.
29/03/2018
Posted by: Keith Bradby
South Coast Festival of Birds
The South Coast Festival of Birds' events took place in February and March 2018. Activities included outings,library talks workshops, a photo and art exhibition, symposium, film nights, and more. This festival was organised by Green Skills and BirdLife Western Australia, with support by Lotterywest and many local groups and organisations.
28/03/2018
Posted by: Basil Schur
Big Day in Canberra's Botanic Gardens
The global face of Connectivity Conservation. As members of the World Commission on Protected Areas, Gondwana Link Chair Virginia Young and CEO Keith Bradby have attended a day long workshop at the Botanic Gardens in Canberra, to review a proposed set of international standards for Areas of Connectivity Conservation.
25/03/2018
Posted by: Keith Bradby
Celebrating the Fitzgerald Biosphere renomination
Yesterday was awesome. Along with 160 others, I attended the celebration of the 40th anniversary of the Fitzgerald Biosphere and the successful renomination of this remarkable place into the global UNESCO Man and the Biosphere Programme.
24/03/2018
Posted by: Amanda Keesing
Focus on the Pallinup
Late notice but the ‘Focus On The Pallinup; Sheoaks, Pools and Floods’ morning hosted by Steve and Geraldine Janicke and North Stirlings Pallinup Natural Resources.
19/03/2018
Posted by: Keith Bradby
Kids on Country
Great work happening in and around Coolgardie. Kids leading the way back to country and developing 'kid to kid' visits with their Indonesian friends.
14/03/2018
Posted by: Keith Bradby
Love living in an ancient ecosystem! 40 Million years plus.
It is often claimed that Australians plants need fire and are adapted to fire, but what is the evidence for such statements? Shown here is a fossilised cone of a Banksia that lived 40 million years ago next to a cone of a Banksia that is with us today. The climate was a lot wetter when the ancient Banksia was around, so protection against fire is a very unlikely explanation for the structure we see. Defence against predators like cockatoos would appear to be a far more likely explanation, argue
07/03/2018
Posted by: Keith Bradby