Gondwana Link

Gondwana Link Blog

Building ecological knowledge

Filming to make short documentaries
Yes we are out there gathering some of many stories about the wonderful people, groups and places we work with. Gondwana Link now has an ongoing program of short documentaries, and maybe a a long one or two, with 'Sound in the Ground' the first to be filmed. Its incredibly exciting what local groups like Friends of the Porongurups have achieved, and its time to share that excitement with a much wider audience.
12/11/2018
Posted by: Keith Bradby
Margaret River Bioblitz 2016
Another Cape to Cape Catchments Group BioBlitz - this time around Mammoth Cave and the surrounding karri forest. The Cape to Cape group hold these events regularly and it gives locals and visitors the opportunity to learn more about the plants and animals they live with. There are activities for school groups, wildflower walks, spotlighting, talks and more.
19/10/2016
Posted by: Keith Bradby
BioBlitz at Chingarrup Sanctuary
A week-long Bio-blitz has just finished at Chingarrup Sanctuary, in the Fitz-Stirling section of Gondwana Link. Owners Eddy and Donna Wajon have hosted a procession of studious visitors, with great knowledge gained across a range of disciplines - cultural sites recorded and mapped, even more orchids recorded, river pool bathymetry mapped, aquatic ecology benchmarked, wildflower surveys and even more orchids recorded, again. Some highlights of the week have been captured
01/10/2016
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Albany Wildflower Society at Chingarrup Sanctuary
Seems that there is something good happening every day in the Fitz-Stirling section of Gondwana Link. The Albany Wildflower Society have been out there recently as part of a whirlwind of activity happening on Eddy and Donna Wajon's Chingarrup Sanctuary. Kath Gray from the Wildflower Society wrote:"Wonderful 2 days spent at Chingarrup and Nowanup properties, learning about how to sample for Macro-invertebrates from local river systems, creeks and rock pools.
28/09/2016
Posted by: Keith Bradby
Crunchy leaf litter underfoot is the quintessential Australian bushwalking experience.
Right? Well, No actually, that's only in recent years. The first time I walked through an area with lots of Woylies I found myself walking on moist compost like material, the result of frenetic soil scratching and food searching by the Woylies. So its been great to see this very important and impressive data and analysis on litter accumulation when a more complete suite of Australia's pre 1788 native mammals
31/03/2016
Posted by: Keith Bradby
Does our restoration work really nudge evolution along and strengthen ecological resilience?
In another new initiative for the Fitz-Stirling section of the Link, an Australian Research Council Linkage grant of $400,000 has been awarded to a consortium led by Professor Steve Hopper, from the University of WA Albany, along with Dr?s Dave Coates, Margaret Byrne and Melissa Miller from Department of Parks and Wildlife, and Dr Sieggy Krauss from the WA Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority. We are delighted that these
10/07/2015
Posted by: Keith Bradby
Water sampling
Paula Deegan sampling a pool in Chereninup Creek Reserve. Creeks are an important target in the Fitz Stirling Functional Landscape Plan, yet we have barely any baseline data on their condition. That is changing.
03/07/2009
Posted by: Keith Bradby
Invertebrate monitoring at Chereninup
We are starting to get a better handle on what a number of key invertebrate species are doing in the Fitz-Stirling section of the Link. Professor Jonathon Major, from Curtin University, has been a solid supporter and now has student Tommy Cheng at work sampling populations across Bush Heritage?s Chereninup Reserve. We helped Tommy to select his sites and introduced him to his on-ground hosts Ross and Rhonda Williams.
14/01/2008
Posted by: Keith Bradby
How healthy are those creeks?
Healthy creeks and waterways have been identified as a key target for ecological repair work in the Link?s Fitz-Stirling area. Little is known about the area's waterways and almost no data exists. As part of the ?Knowledge Connections? project, funded by Lotterywest, Angela Sanders and Paula Deegan have been systematically visiting creeks, including Corackerup and Hegarty Creeks, and starting the work of establishing benchmark data. Thanks to Department
11/12/2007
Posted by: Keith Bradby
An Elder of the Sciences meets an Elder of the Eucalypts.
The Wild Country Science team is currently on survey work in the magnificent woodlands east of the wheatbelt. Distinguished biologist Henry Nix, pictured with his wife Katherine, had the opportunity to spend time in the shade of ?Big Bertha?, one of the many ancient Salmon Gums growing in the area. This tree is thought to be over 500 years old.
28/08/2007
Posted by: Keith Bradby
Fungi richness
A few good rains gets the fungi going, and mycologist Katie Syme. Katie has recently completed a fungi and truffle hunt on Bush Heritage’s Chereninup Creek Reserve. Here is a selection of the wonderful specimens she found. Just as the work of earlier botanists has opened our eyes to the exceptional richness of south-western Australia, so Katie’s work is uncovering a significant unrealised dimension to that richness – the
26/06/2007
Posted by: Keith Bradby
More fungi
The previous post had some of the fungi Katrina Syme has found but they are just so varied and interesting that we wanted to share more photos. Here they are. Aren?t they amazing?
26/06/2007
Posted by: Keith Bradby
How much carbon do our trees hold?
More destructive carbon sampling work underway this week to determine how much carbon is being sequestered by existing native vegetation. Data is being logged on-site and again after the stems and branches have been dried. The flat topped yate being sampled here is looking good as a strong sequester of above ground carbon. The work is being undertaken as part of the Shell-Greening Australia Reconnections project.
05/04/2006
Posted by: Keith Bradby
There’s carbon in them there trees?
We know that every planting program produces trees and shrubs that sequester carbon, but we don?t know how much carbon. If we had that extra bit of knowledge, then it?s possible the emerging carbon market may help fund the much needed restoration work across Gondwana Link. As part of the Shell-Greening Australia Reconnections project, Greening?s Barry Heydenrych is working to measure the carbon in key species. The
02/12/2005
Posted by: Keith Bradby
Fauna survey of Honman Ridge
Black-naped snake with Charles Roche during the fauna survey for Honman Ridge. Charles is The Wilderness Society?s ?outback campaigner?, working for better protection and management of the public land north-east of Ravensthorpe and east of the Rabbit Proof Fence. Zoologists Barry Traill and Susie Duncan led the survey program for the area, which is now being documented into report form.
17/11/2005
Posted by: Keith Bradby
More on those wonderful woodlands
Those wonderful woodlands! A major science expedition is underway in the woodlands end of Gondwana Link. As part of the Wilderness Society?s Wild Country Science program, and with additional funding from the Australian Research Council, Professor Brendan Mackey and the team from the Australian National University, plus noted zoologist Professor Harry Recher been establishing and surveying a series of vegetation quadrats across this massive natural area. The survey
18/09/2005
Posted by: Keith Bradby
Those wonderful woodlands!
A major science expedition is underway in the woodlands end of Gondwana Link. As part of the Wilderness Society?s Wild Country Science program, and with additional funding from the Australian Research Council, Professor Brendan Mackey and the team from the Australian National University, plus noted zoologist Professor Harry Recher been establishing and surveying a series of vegetation quadrats across this massive natural area. The survey team also includes Sandy
18/09/2005
Posted by: Keith Bradby